Services

Comprehensive eye exam

The Importance of a regular eye exam for adults
During your eye exam the doctor is not only evaluating your eyes for visual correction (if you need eye glasses or contact lenses), they are also checking the overall health and function of your eye.

Most eye diseases have very little or slow symptoms and cannot be detected unless you have a comprehensive eye exam. It is important to catch eye diseases early as some diseases, like Glaucoma, are not reversible, but they can be managed and prevented.

Examples of what the doctor looking for:

Refractive error: This refers to your prescription and is corrected with eye glasses, contact lenses or surgery
Strabismus: This has to do with the muscular function in the eye
Eye Diseases: These can be detected by looking at the eye’s blood vessels, retina and so forth. Diseases include Glaucoma, Cancer, Cataracts, Retinitis Pigmentosa and many others.
Eye Problems like dry eyes or computer syndrome

The importance of an eye exam for children and Infants

Since many eye problems arise from conditions that can be identified by an eye doctor in an infant’s first year of life, a parent can give an infant a great gift by seeking an eye assessment in addition to the wellness evaluation of the eyes that is done by a pediatrician or family practice doctor.

How often should I get an eye exam?

Children: An assessment between six and 12 months of age is recommended to determine if an infant is at risk for eye or vision disorders. Children should at least have had one eye examination by the age of three, and then every two years after that (more often if recommended by your optometrist).
Adults: We recommended every two years, especially after the age of 40 as age increases the risk of many eye diseases.
Seniors: Over the age of 70 an annual eye exam is recommended.

Retinal Camera

What is a Retinal Camera?

A retinal camera is a specialized low power microscope with an attached camera designed to photograph the interior surface of the eye, including the retina, optic disc, macula, and posterior pole (i.e. the fundus).

Diabetic Vision maintenance

What is Diabetic Retinopathy?
Diabetes is a disease that occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or the body is unable to process it properly. Insulin is the hormone that regulates the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Diabetes can affect children and adults.

How does diabetes affect the retina?
Patients with diabetes are more likely to develop eye problems such as cataracts and glaucoma, but the disease’s affect on the retina is the main threat to vision. Most patients develop diabetic changes in the retina after approximately 20 years. The effect of diabetes on the eye is called diabetic retinopathy.

Laser Surgery co-management

Most people with vision correction issues want to know more about LASIK and whether it is right for them.

Here is a brief description of the procedure
A flap is surgically cut in the cornea and gently folded back. An Excimer Laser is used to reshape the cornea into a flatter shape (this is much like a contact lens corrects vision by forming a new shape on the cornea). The flap is then put back in place, acting like a natural bandage. The healing process is quick and the discomfort level is quite low.

People will often say that they did not feel anything, and could see well the very first day. Most people have improved vision in 24-28 hours, but it must be noted that each person will heal at a different rate. Vision, although greatly improved immediately after surgery, often continues to improve for some weeks, even months.

LASIK is not for everyone. Eye conditions vary and only after a comprehensive examination will we be able to decide if LASIK surgery is the best course of treatment for you. If you are interested in laser vision correction, we will be happy to guide you in picking the right surgeon, procedure and laser appropriate care for you.